SUCROSE AND SWADDLING EFFECTIVELY REDUCE PAIN RESPONSE ON NEONATAL BLOOD SPOT BY HEEL PRICK

Mega Hasanul Huda, Rustina Yeni, Agustini Nur

Abstract

Background: Pain stimulates distress emergence that potentially impairs the development and growth on neonates. Heel prick brings about pain. This research aimed at observing the effectiveness of sucrose and swaddling on pain response to neonates.
Methods: A clinical trial was designed by random under control using cross-over design. This study involved 24 neonates (aged 28 days) which taken from population using a consecutive sampling technique. Each subject was given two treatments of sucrose (24%) and swaddling, but the pain responses were observed at different time during and after received the heel prick (1, 2, and 3 minutes). Response of neonatal pain focused on face observation, oxygen saturation, and heart rate, but scored by the experts using a set of observation sheets from Cries Neonatal Postoperative Pain Measurement Tool (CNPPMT).

Results: During the heel prick, the average of pain response was found higher on sucrose group (2.67). After a minute elapsed, the average of pain response on both groups was similar (1.96). After two and three minutes elapsed, the average of pain response was found higher on swaddling group. Bivariate results showed that there was no different average of the pain response on both groups during the heel prick (p=0.925) and after the heel prick (one minute (p=0.915), two minutes (p= 0.942), and three minutes (p=0.132)).

Conclusions: Research revealed that sucrose and swaddling equally effective in reducing pain response on neonatal blood spot by heel prick. Swaddling could be carried out to reduce pain response on infants when pricking applied. 

Full Text:

PDF

References

Moghaddam, B. K., Basiri-Moghaddam, M., Sadeghmoghaddam, L. & Ahmadi, F. (2011). The concept of hospitalization of children from the view point of parents and children. Iran J Pediatr, 21 (2), 201-8

Murki, S. & Subramanian, S. (2011). Sucrose for Analgesia in Newborn Infants Undergoing Painful Procedures. Geneva: World Health Organization

Malarvizhi, G., Manju, V., Roseline, M., Nithin, S. & Sarah, P. (2012). Interrater-reliability of neonatal infant pain scale as multidimentional behavioral pain tool. Nitte University of Journal of Health Science, 3(2), 26-30.

Kee, J.L.F. (2007). Pedoman Pemeriksaan Laboratorium & Diagnostik (6th ed). Jakarta: EGC.

Bowden, V.R. & Greenberg, C.S. (2010). Children and Their Families: The Continum of Care (2nd ed). Philadelpia: Lippincott William [6]

Steven, B., Yamada, J. & Ohlsson, A. (2013). Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures. Cochraen Database

of Systematic Reviews, 3 (CD 001069), 1-66.

Joung, K.H. & Soo, C.C. (2010). The effect of sucrose on infants during a painful procedure. Korean J Pediatr, 53 (8), 790-794.

Steven, B., Yamada, J. & Ohlsson, A. (2013). Sucrose for analgesia in newborn infants undergoing painful procedures. Cochraen Database

of Systematic Reviews, 3 (CD 001069), 1-66.

Shu, S.H., Lee, Y.L., Hayter, M. & Wang, R.H. (2014). Efficacy of swaddling and heel warming on pain response to heel stick in neonates: A randomised control trial. J Clin Nurs, 23(21-22), 3107-14.

Huang, C.M., Tung, W.S., Kuo, L.L. & Ying-J, C. (2004). Comparison of pain responses of premature infants to the heelstick between

containment and swaddling. J Nurs Res, 12 (1), 31-40.

Carbajal, R., Rousset, A., Coquery, S., Nolent, P., Ducrocq, S. & Breart, G. (2008). Epidemiology and treatment of painful procedures in neonates in intensive care unit. JAMA, 300(1), 60-70.

Wente, S.J. (2013). Nonpharmacologic pediatric pain management in emergency departements: A systematic review of the literature. J

Emerg Nurs, 39(2), 140-50.

Bowden, V.R., Dickey, S. & Greenberg, C. (2010). Children and Their Families: The Continum of Care. Philadelpa: Wolters Kluwer

Health

Bilgen, H., Eren, O., Dilsat, C., & Rahmi, O. (2001). Comparison of sucrose, expressed breast milk, and breast-feeding on the neonatal

response to heel prick. The Journal of Pain, 2(5), 301-305.

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.